Quick Answer: Is It Grammatically Correct To Start A Sentence With It?

Is it grammatically correct to start a sentence with that?

According to this article’s text, this phrase is grammatically acceptable: The sequence can be understood as any of three grammatically-correct sequences, each with at least three discrete sentences, by adding punctuation: That that is, is.

That that is not, is not..

Is it grammatically correct to start a sentence with like?

Remember these two rules when considering the use of like: Rule 1: Like can be either a verb or a preposition but not a conjunction. … In sentences 1, 2, and 3, we should use the conjunction as or as if in place of the word like because in each case like is followed by a clause.

How do you use for example in a sentence?

You use for example to introduce and emphasize something which shows that something is true…. … Take, for example, the simple sentence: ‘The man climbed up the hill’.A few simple precautions can be taken, for example ensuring that desks are the right height.

What are some good sentence starters?

3. Use Different Words to Order Events and Sequence Timeto be sure… additionally… lastlyeventuallyin the meantimefirst… just in the same way… finallyfinallyfor the time beingbasically… similarly… as well asfirst of allthe next stepafterwardto begin within conclusionat firstin the first placein time4 more rows•Jan 9, 2020

What words can you not start a sentence with?

Or never begins a sentence, paragraph, or chapter. Never begin a sentence—or a clause—with also. Teach the elimination of but, so, and, because, at the beginning of a sentence. A sentence should not commence with the conjunctions and, for, or however….

How do I start my introduction?

IntroductionsAttract the Reader’s Attention. Begin your introduction with a “hook” that grabs your reader’s attention and introduces the general topic. … State Your Focused Topic. After your “hook”, write a sentence or two about the specific focus of your paper. … State your Thesis. Finally, include your thesis statement.

How do you start a topic paragraph?

First, write a topic sentence that summarizes your point. This is the first sentence of your paragraph. Next, write your argument, or why you feel the topic sentence is true. Finally, present your evidence (facts, quotes, examples, and statistics) to support your argument.

Is it grammatically correct to start a sentence with yet?

As yet is classed as a coordinating conjunction, many would still say that it should never be at the start of a sentence. … Putting conjunctions such as yet at the start of a sentence is acceptable, as long as you use it correctly.

How do you use yet?

We use yet as an adverb to refer to a time which starts in the past and continues up to the present. We use it mostly in negative statements or questions in the present perfect. It usually comes in end position: Kevin hasn’t registered for class yet.

How do we use like?

When to Use Like Instead of As Most of the time, like compares two things. Imagine a grown woman acting as a child. Here, we’re comparing two things (the woman and the child), so like should be used. Imagine a grown woman acting like a child.

What is to in English grammar?

To as a preposition: destination or direction We can use to as a preposition to indicate a destination or direction: We’re going to Liverpool next week.

What is a good way to start a sentence?

Seven Effective Ways to Start a SentenceAdjective (a word that modifies a noun) Example: Grateful, I sent a thank you note to the women who returned my lost cell phone.Adverb (a word that modifies a verb) … Prepositional phrase (a phrase that starts with a preposition) … Infinitive phrase. … Gerund phrase. … Participle phrase. … Adverb clause.

What is another word for yet?

What is another word for yet?furtheradditionallystillfurthermoreagainalsobesidesmoreoveralongeven54 more rows

What are some good linking words?

Examples of linking words and phrasesLanguage functionPrepositions/ prepositional phrases (come before noun phrases)Adverbs/Adverbial phrases (join two sentences)Cause/effectbecause of, due toas a result, thereforeOppositiondespite, in spite ofhoweverContraston the other handAdditionfurthermore, in addition, moreover1 more row